Call today to schedule your immigration consultation 954-385-0157 or email: BAlvarado@Blandon-Law.com.

Blandon Law Immigration

Friday, January 8, 2010

Becoming a Resident Through Adjustment Despite Criminal Convictions


     Adjustment of Status is a term used for becoming a legal permanent resident when the foreign national lives in the United States. When there are no criminal convictions, this process is normally completed at an interview with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service.  However, if the foreign national has been convicted of a crime which makes her deportable, Immigration will deny the adjustment and the foreigner will be placed in removal proceedings.

     Interestingly, some crimes make a foreigner deportable, but not inadmissible.  Whether a crime makes a person deportable, inadmissible, or both, involves a criminal analysis performed by an immigration professional.  If the government considers a foreigner inadmissible, it will deny a visa to enter the U.S., adjustment of status to become a resident, or naturalization to become a citizen.

     If the crime does not make the person inadmissible, the Judge during removal proceedings may still grant Adjustment of Status.  Boom, bam.  Not only does the foreigner become a legal permanent resident but also she is no longer deportable.

General Frequently Asked Questions

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954-385-0157 or email: blandonappts@aol.com